Aesthetic Services
Excessive Sweating / Hyperhidrosis

Hyperhidrosis is a medical condition described as: sweating beyond what is necessary to cool the body. It commonly affects the hands, feet, groin, face and underarms. Hyperhidrosis can have a serious impact on self-confidence, personal relationships and even career success. But today’s treatments offer hope. Innovative surgical and non-surgical approaches allow you to specifically treat the affected area painlessly and easily. Some people with hyperhidrosis will need blood work done to rule out an underlying medical condition as the cause for the sweating. The best treatment is knowledge.

Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS)
Score = 1 My sweating is never noticeable and never interferes with my daily activities
Score = 2 My sweating is tolerable but sometimes interferes with my daily activities
Score = 3 My sweating is barely tolerable and frequently interferes with my daily activities
Score = 4 My sweating is intolerable and always interferes with my daily activities

You are not alone!
It is estimated that approximately 2.8 per cent of the Americans suffer from hyperhidrosis. Up to 910 000 Canadians could have hyperhidrosis. In one study, 54.8% of patients living with underarm hyperhidrosis (HDSS of 3 or 4) felt unhappy and 35.7% reported feeling depressed.

But the good news is that there is help!

The most common ways to treat Hyperhidrosis are:
Topical antiperspirant treatments: applying aluminum chloride hexahydrate, typically useful only in HDSS 1 or 2 only. Can be quite irritating to the skin.
Oral medication: There are no medications approved in Canada for the treatment of hyperhidrosis and those that are used tend to cause many side effects including dizziness, blurry vision and constipation.
Iontophoresis: applying low-intensity electric current for treatment of the hands or feet - can be time consuming with treatments taking 30 min per area and initially are done 3-4 times per week.
Surgery: severing the nerves that cause excess sweating. Is quite effective but doesn't last forever.
Focal injections: Botox injections are made to a localized area of increased sweating using ultrafine needles to interupt the nerve signal to the sweat glands . Since the treatment is virtually painless, the underarms, face and head, can be treated without anesthesia. Hands and feet need some anaesthesia.

What you need to know about Botox for Hyperhidrosis
Effectiveness - 95% of BOTOX®–treated patients responded at week 1 with an average sweat reduction of 83% and by week 16 82% of people still had an average sweat reduction of 69%.
Duration - Typically 4 to 7 months when treated with 50 U per axilla. 6-9 months is possible when 100 U/axilla are used.
Cost - The treatment medication is covered by most private drug plans. If you are unable to ascertain from your insurance company what your coverage is – there is help. The maker of Botox has introduced a program to let patients with a private drug plan try Botox for hyperhidrosis with no risk that your drug plan will deny it – if you are denied they will pay for the cost of your Botox. You only pay for the injection fee which is $250. The cost of the Botox itself is temporarily charged to your credit card - if your insurance approves your claim you are reimbursed everything except your usual drug co-payment. If you claim is denied the full amount on your credit card for Botox charges is refunded and Allergan will pay for the Botox. This is a one time program.
If you know you are covered or once you or for subsequent treatments after the Botox Access Program you pay $8/unit and claim this directly from your insurance company. For the underarms you typically get 100 U/side = 200 U = $1600. If you have a 10% co pay this means that ultimately you pay $160 and if you have a 20% co pay this means that you ultimately pay $320.
Limitations - Side effects, if they occur, are temporary. There may be local mild pain or bruising from the injection, and a perceived increase in non-axillary sweating.

Axilla Botox

Book a consultation with Dr. Kate Kelly to discuss treatment.

 

 

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